Animals

Birds

Red-winged blackbird<– Red-winged blackbird (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)
Great blue heron<– Great blue heron (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)
Great blue heron hunting.<– Great blue heron (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)

American bittern

<– American bittern (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)

American bittern on nest

<– Bittern on nest (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)

Song sparrow.<– Song sparrow (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)
Yellow warbler<– Yellow warbler (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)

Amphibians

The spring peeper is a tiny frog (only about 1 inch long) with a big voice that echoes in a loud chorus across the waters of the bog from late March through May. Learn more about the species and hear its call here.

<– Pseudacris crucifer or spring peeper (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)

The bullfrog the largest frog in North America and it has a deep booming voice to match its size. Learn more about the species and hear its call here.

<– Rana catesbeiana or bullfrog (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)

Gray tree frogs spend their adult life in trees, but lay their eggs in puddle, ponds and bogs. This one looks green but they can change their color to match their surroundings — gray for tree bark, green for lily pads and sphagnum moss. Tree frogs have large adhesive toe pads that they use for climbing.<– Hyla versicolor or Eastern gray tree frog (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)
Green frog<– Rana clamitans or green frog (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)
The leopard frog gets its name from the low rumbling sound of its call which sounds like the growling of a large cat. Leopard frogs are becoming rare in our area. Learn more about this species and hear its call here.<– Rana pipiens or leopard frog (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)
You can tell a toad from a frog by its skin — the American toad has bumpy skin, frogs have smooth skin. Learn more about this species and hear its call here.<– Bufo americanus or American toad (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)
In spring, you can easily find the eggs of frogs and salamanders in the bog. You can see the tiny tadpoles developing inside these salamander eggs.<– Salamander eggs (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)
Red-spotted newt.<– Notophthalmus viridescens or red-spotted newt (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)

Mammals

Beaver

<– Beaver (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)

Trees chewed by beavers.

<– Beaver trees (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)

Deer mouse<– Deer mouse (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)
Meadow vole.<– Meadow vole (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)
Moose<– Moose (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)
Moose.<– Moose (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)
Muskrat<– muskrat (click thumbnail image to view photograph.)

About

MooseWood Nature Center is an independent, non-profit organization supported by memberships, donations and grants. Our mission is to celebrate nature through education and action in the Upper Peninsula.

Hours

Sat & Sun 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM
or by appointment

Phone: (906) 228-6250